Regional parks

Important notice

Please note there is no vehicle access beyond the main car park to Solomon's Bay. Please refer to the park map for walking or mountain bike details on distance, direction and time.

About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About this park

Atiu Creek Farm was gifted to the Auckland Regional Council by Jackie and Pierre Chatelanat who wanted to ensure that all New Zealanders could enjoy access to the Kaipara Harbour, and that the cultural and heritage values of the area would be protected.


Opening hours

Pedestrian access Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours
6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
(Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours
6:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
(Non daylight savings)

How to get to Atiu Creek

Journey north on State Highway 1 to Wellsford.  Turn left at the Caltex station and service centre onto Port Albert Road.  Follow the signs to the park. The property lies on the Kaipara Harbour, on the Okahukura (Tapora) Peninsula.

View larger map

Distance from Auckland CBD

113 km

Access issues

Please note there is no vehicle access beyond the main car park to Solomon's Bay. Please refer to the park map for walking or mountain bike details on distance, direction and time.


Maps

Park facilities

SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas Atiu SCC parking area
Accessible picnic table
Accessible picnic table

The picnic table has been designed to accommodate a wheelchair at the end. Some assistance may be required to push the wheelchair to the table.

Interpretation
Interpretation
Limited mobility parking
Limited mobility parking

The surface of the carpark is loose gravel; however, there are wide grassed areas on the perimeter of the carpark where it is possible to park your car and push your wheelchair over the grass. There is no defined parking and none designated for mobility parking.

Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

The toilet block in the main carpark is wheelchair accessible.

Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)

This farm park is accessible using all-terrain mobility equipment, and some paths are suitable for the more powerful models of mobility scooter. For special access provisions contact us on 09 301 0101.

Native bush
Native bush
Parking
Parking

In main area

Pram access
Pram access

Access for prams is possible around most of the park following the formed roads. The roads have a good surface for off-road prams to explore the views or walk to the harbour. There are some steep sections of road. At most gateways there are ramps allowing off-road prams and mountain bikes through, you will need to lift your pram over gates without ramps.

Toilet block
Toilet block

Park activities

History

Atiu Creek Regional Park has a long history of human occupation extending back at least six centuries. Tangata whenua of this land are subtribal groups of Te Uri o Hau and Ngāti Whatua, in particular the people associated with nearby Oruawharo Marae. Their stories are told in the carvings of the pou kaitiaki that watch over sacred sites and stand guardian over all who visit the park.

The long Māori occupation is also reflected in the numerous archaeological sites present on the property.  They include several large pā (fortifications) which defended the resources of the land and the strategically important Opou walking and canoe portage between the north and south Kaipara. Other archaeological sites include occupation terraces, gardening areas, food storage pits and midden (food refuse) sites.

The whole of the Okahukura peninsula came into European ownership in 1877 when purchased by Thomas Fitzgerald.  The remaining stands of timber were milled and the property developed into an extensive unfenced grazing run.  Kauri gum was dug throughout the area and oyster farming was briefly undertaken in the adjacent Oruawharo River.

In the early 1900s ‘Fitzgerald’s Run’ was named ‘Seaview’.  It was purchased by young British-born Pierre Chatelanat in 1951. He sold the majority of the block to the government for development as returned soldiers farms and retained the portion that became known as Atiu Creek Farm. An extensive programme of land clearance, fencing, roading, tree planting and building was carried out firstly by Pierre, and then by his farm managers and staff, creating an outstanding model farm. As a result of the The Chatelanat’s generous gift to the people of New Zealand, the property transferred into council ownership in 2006.