Regional parks

Remember to be a tidy Kiwi this summer

All our regional parks are rubbish free. Whether you call it rubbish, trash or garbage, please bag it all up and recycle it or throw it away when you return home.

Important notice

Keep Kauri standing

Kauri dieback is a deadly disease, killing Kauri trees throughout the Auckland region. The Kauri in Awhitu regional park are currently healthy, please help us keep it that way. Click here for more information. Also see information about track closures in the Hunua ranges .

About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About Awhitu

For a map of the park, click here.

A pleasant country drive through Waiuku and 33km beyond, leads to peaceful Awhitu on the southwest shores of the Manukau Harbour. Wander freely over parkland pastures, explore the wetlands, enjoy the safe, sandy beaches and sheltered picnic and barbecue areas.


For dog walking (prohibited) information across regional parks, click here.

Opening hours

Pedestrian access: Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours:
6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. (Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours:
6:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. (Non daylight savings)
Distance from CBD: 90 km
Physical address: Brook Road, Waiuku
Casual group size: 75

How to get to Awhitu

Take State Highway 1 south, turn off at Drury and follow the signs to Waiuku. From Waiuku drive up the Awhitu Peninsula through Matakawau. About 2km past Matakawau turn right down Brook Rd into the park.

View larger map


Maps

Park facilities

Bookable site
Bookable site Awhitu Bookable Site
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas Awhitu SCC parking area
BBQ
BBQ

There are five wood-burning BBQs (you must provide your own wood). One BBQ is a bookable site just off from the carpark, near the toilets and drinking fountain. Large groups require a permit. Two of the BBQs are in the campsites.

Beaches
Beaches

There are two beaches: Brook Beach and Kauritutahi Beach. We recommend footwear at all times due to sharp oyster shells along the beach.

Boat ramp
Boat ramp

There is a boat ramp at the end of Featon Avenue in the north of the park. There is access to the water for two hours either side of high tide only.

Historic homesteads
Historic homesteads
Interpretation
Interpretation
Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

The main carpark has wheelchair accessible toilets.

Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)

Roads and paths are metal and access is dependant on ground conditions.

Native bush
Native bush
Notice board
Notice board
Parking
Parking

There are an additional 425 parks available on the golf course paddocks and 144 on the access road paddock.

Picnic tables
Picnic tables
Potable water
Potable water

There is a drinking fountain by the toilets at the carpark.

Pram access
Pram access

Awhitu is largely pram-friendly. Walks may be challenging in places and are dependent on conditions.

Ranger contact phone
Ranger contact phone
Ranger office
Ranger office
Toilet block
Toilet block
Wharf / jetty
Wharf / jetty

Park activities

History

The Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Kahukoka people originally occupied the Äwhitu Peninsula. Their descendents still maintain strong links to this land, with marae located in and around Waiuku.

The large waka Toki-a-Tāpiri, which now rests at the Auckland Museum, came from this area.

Evidence from middens on the park indicates Māori used the local area extensively for fishing and resource gathering.

English immigrants John and Sarah Brook built the Brook Homestead, originally called Brook Haven, in 1878.  It remains a central feature of the park. The family added the bach in front of the homestead in 1907.

The old jetty, which remains at Kauritūtahi Bay, was also built by the Brook family. It was a lifeline to the outside world when this far-flung place had no roads. Basic supplies and visitors came in across these boards and kauri posts and farm products went out.

In 1971, John Brook’s grandson Fred sold his land to the Auckland Regional Council (ARC). Āwhitu Regional Park was officially opened in 1975 and continues to operate as a working farm.

To mark the park’s 25th anniversary, a carving (pouwhenua) depicting the fern bird (mātātā) was erected overlooking the wetlands in November 2000. It was carved from a Kauri planted by the Brook family.