Regional parks

Important notice

Keep Kauri standing

Kauri dieback is a deadly disease, killing Kauri trees throughout the Auckland region. The Kauri in Duder regional park are currently healthy, please help us keep it that way! For more information visit Kauri protection.  Also see information about Track closures in the Hunua ranges or www.kauridieback.co.nz

About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About this park

Duder park is located on the pohutukawa-fringed Whakakaiwhara Peninsula, which cuts out into the Tamaki Strait. Visitors may feel like they are on their own island as they enjoy the 360 degree views extending to the Brookby/Maraetai hills, the Hunua Ranges and Hauraki Gulf islands.


Opening hours

Pedestrian access Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
(Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours
8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
(Non daylight savings)

How to get to Duder

Take State Highway 1 south and turn off at Te Irirangi Drive and veer left. At the fourth set of traffic lights turn right into Ormiston Road and head towards Whitford. At the T-junction turn left into Whitford and right at the roundabout onto Whitford - Maraetai Road. Continue through Maraetai and take Maraetai Coast Road to Umupuia. The park is just to the south of Umupuia on North Road.

View larger map

Distance from Auckland CBD

42 km


Maps

Park facilities

SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas Duder SCC Parking Area
Accessible picnic table
Accessible picnic table

The picnic area adjoining the carpark is on a flat, grassed area and is wheelchair accessible.

Beaches
Beaches

Umupuia Beach is a sandy beach available at low tide along the coastal walk. Good swimming available here. Also a couple of sheltered sandy bays off the farm loop track.

Interpretation
Interpretation
Limited mobility parking
Limited mobility parking

The surface is small, loose gravel throughout, but it is accessible in a wheelchair. There is no defined parking and none designated for mobility parking.

Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

The main carpark has wheelchair accessible toilets.

Long drop / vault toilet
Long drop / vault toilet
Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)

This is a coastal farm park with beautiful views of the Hauraki Gulf and few man-made structures. The land is predominately gentle, undulating grassland. Parts of the park are accessible to mobility impaired visitors, particularly on the well-structured paths, even if the ground is wet.

Native bush
Native bush
Notice board
Notice board
Parking
Parking
Pram access
Pram access

It is possible to access the stockyards (and possibly beyond) with a pram.

Toilet block
Toilet block

Park activities

History

In the 14th century, this was the first place in the Waitemata Harbour to be visited by the Tainui canoe. Its crew went ashore and harvested forest foods, which led to the peninsula’s name – Whaka-kai-whara meaning ‘to eat the bracts of the kiekie vine’.

Some of the descendants of the crew settled in the area and became known as Ngäi Tai. They lived on the peninsula until the 1860s, taking advantage of its abundant food resources (including seasonal shark fishing) and its strategic location near the Wairoa River mouth.

Ngāi Tai’s affiliation to the land is reflected in the many archaeological sites on and near the park. The most significant of these are Whakakaiwhara Pā at the tip of the peninsula and Oue Pā several kilometres to the south.

The kauri forest on the peninsula was logged in the 1850s. In 1866 the Duder family began its association with the area when Thomas Duder, a survivor of the HMS Buffalo wreck (1840), bought the 243-hectare property from Ngāi Tai.
His descendants farmed the property until it was sold to the Auckland Regional Council (ARC) and became a regional park in 1995.