Regional parks

About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About this park

Long Bay is a busy seaside park, protecting the most northern of the east coast bays and lying adjacent to the Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve.


Opening hours

Pedestrian access Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours
6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
(Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours
6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
(Non daylight savings)

How to get to Long Bay

From Auckland, head north on State Highway 1 (northern motorway) and take the Oteha Valley Road off-ramp. Turn right and follow Oteha Valley Road to the traffic lights. Go straight ahead into Carlisle Road and follow the signs through Torbay to Long Bay. The Park access road leads off Beach Road.

View larger map

Distance from Auckland CBD

30 km

Public transport information

A regular bus service operates between Auckland CBD and Long Bay. Buses drop visitors off then park in the bus park in the southern ground.

www.maxx.co.nz

Access issues

On public holiday weekends and fine weekend days access to the park can be difficult. Expect queues of 1km or more back to Torbay shops waiting to get into the park.

There is an automatic opening and closing vehicle access gate operating between 6am and 9pm all year round. This means there is no vehicle entry after automatic gate closing times. Vehicles can exit after automatic gate closing times, by driving up to the gate which will automatically open.

There are signs on the gate with instructions to follow if the gate does not open. The main gate may be closed for pest control weeks and emergencies. Notices will be posted on the Parks Contact Centre Bulletin Board when this occurs.


Maps

Park facilities

SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas Long Bay SCC Parking Area
BBQ
BBQ

Casual BBQs: There are 4 electric BBQs, 2 single wood fired BBQs available for casual use. Bookable sites BBQs: These BBQs are able to be used if the site has not been booked. There are 4 electric BBQs on 3 of the bookable sites. All BBQ's are FREE to use.

Beaches
Beaches

There are three beaches, Long Bay, Granny's Bay and Pohutukawa Bay.

Cellphone coverage
Cellphone coverage

Good

Historic homesteads
Historic homesteads
Interpretation
Interpretation
Limited mobility parking
Limited mobility parking

There are accessible car parks near each of the 3 toilet blocks. North ground: grass car parks are flat and accessible. Playground: marked mobility car park on tarmac. South ground: marked mobility car park on tarmac. These car parks are monitored for unauthorised use by the park rangers.

Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

There are three sets of toilets in the park, all with disability access toilet cubicles.

Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)

Long Bay has a great deal to offer people with limited mobility. The southern end of the park is made up of grassed areas bordered by a long sandy beach on one side and a road on the other. The grassed areas are all on gently rolling slopes.

Notice board
Notice board
Parking
Parking
Picnic tables
Picnic tables

There are seven bookable sites suitable for groups. Groups of 100 must obtain a permit. You are also free to find your own favourite spot to picnic.

Potable water
Potable water
Pram access
Pram access

The picnic area and the beach are pram friendly.

Ranger contact phone
Ranger contact phone
Ranger office
Ranger office
Sealed access road
Sealed access road
Security gates
Security gates
Security surveillance
Security surveillance
Toilet block
Toilet block

Park activities

History

Māori occupants of Long Bay gave it the name Oneroa, meaning long expanse of sand. Ngäti Kahu was the main tribal group to live here until European settlement began in the 1850s.

The Vaughan family bought 600 hectares at Long Bay in 1862 and farmed sheep on the property during the next 100 years. George Vaughan built the Vaughan Homestead as a farm cottage in 1863. It was extended and altered over the years but the Torbay Historical Society has restored it to its present form.

The Vaughan family ran the current picnic areas as a camping ground until they sold the park to the Auckland Regional Council in 1965.

Among the park’s interesting historic sites is a World War II gun emplacement north of the beach (on the Coastal Walk). This was part of a defence network to protect the Waitemata harbour from Japanese invasion.