Regional parks

Remember to be a tidy Kiwi this summer

All our regional parks are rubbish free. Whether you call it rubbish, trash or garbage, please bag it all up and recycle it or throw it away when you return home.

About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About Mahurangi

For a map of the park, click here.

Mahurangi park protects three peninsulas at the mouth of the historic and picturesque Mahurangi Harbour. Mahurangi spans across the Puhoi River, north of Wenderholm, and along Te Muri Beach to Sullivans Bay and Mita Bay.


For dog walking (with restrictions) information across regional parks, click here.

Opening hours

Pedestrian access: Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours:
6:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. (Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours:
6:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. (Non daylight savings)
Distance from CBD: 65 km
Physical address: 190 Ngarewa Drive, Mahurangi West
Casual group size: 75
Access issues:

Mahurangi East has no road access. Access is by boat only.


How to get to Mahurangi

Mahurangi West: Drive north on State Highway 1. About 6km past Wenderholm Regional Park, turn right into Mahurangi West Road then right into Ngarewa Drive and follow to the end of the road. Scott point: Take State Highway 1 to Warkworth and follow the signs to Snells Beach. Approximately 1km past Snells Beach, turn right into Ridge Road and follow to the end of the road.

View larger map


Maps

Park facilities

Building
Building Scott Homestead
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas Mahurangi SCC campground Mahurangi SCC parking area
Beaches
Beaches

There are 3 beaches accessible from Mahurangi West. ● Sullivan's Bay has vehicle access and is the most popular. ● Te Muri beach on the southern end of the park is accessible by foot or boat as is Mita Bay on the northern side. ● There are two main beaches at Mahurangi East. Big Bay is on the east side and Lagoon bay on the west. These are boat access only.

Boat ramp
Boat ramp

There is no boat ramp at Mahurangi. However boats up to 3 metres can be hand launched and retrieved. ● The nearest boat ramp to Sullivan’s Bay is Opahi Bay (tide dependant and only suitable for 4WD launching) which is five minutes away from the main gate. If exiting the park, go back up Ngarewa Drive and turn right down to Opahi Bay. ● There is a boat ramp at the public car park at the end of Ridge Road, next to Scotts Point.

Cellphone coverage
Cellphone coverage

Poor in general but there are patches of coverage in various locations.

Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

There is a limited mobility cubicle at the Sullivan’s Bay Main Toilet Block with access across the sealed road and path.

Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)

Much of Mahurangi is not suitable for those with limited mobility.

Native bush
Native bush

Areas of coastal forest and regenerating bush are dotted throughout Mahurangi Regional Park. The best preserved patches of mature coastal forest can be experienced on a part of the Mita Bay Loop Track and at Cudlip and Te Muri points. Kanuka, taraire, puriri, karaka and kowhai dominate these areas. Scarlet flowering pohutukawa are spectacular at Scott Point and Mahurangi East in summer and on many parts of Mahurangi West.

Notice board
Notice board

Information boards are located throughout Mahurangi Regional Park. The main notice board is located in the middle of Sullivan’s Bay, next to the main toilet block. This notice board contains a map, visitor operations information, codes and bylaws, tide charts and park brochures. There are also notice boards located at each of the campgrounds and orientation boards located at the Te Muri Estuary and Te Muri spit walking track access.

Parking
Parking

There are 2 designated car parks; both located at Mahurangi West. ● Top car park: 25 spaces ● Sullivan’s Bay car park: 40 spaces ● There are also grass overflow parking areas of approximately 200 spaces. Accessible only if the Top and Sullivan’s Bay car parks are full and if ground conditions allow.

Picnic tables
Picnic tables

There are no designated picnic sites but feel free to find your own spot. You are welcome to bring your own gas BBQ.

Potable water
Potable water

There are 5 tap stands dotted around Sullivan’s Bay and 5 in each of Mita Bay and Te Muri Beach campgrounds. There is no public water supply or tap stands at Mahurangi East or Scott Point. All tap water at Mahurangi West is treated bore supply water and safe to drink.

Pram access
Pram access

Sullivans Bay has reasonable pram access across the grass picnic areas.

Ranger contact phone
Ranger contact phone

Located at the main information board which is in the middle of Sullivan’s Bay next to main toilet block.

Security gates
Security gates

An automatic gate is located at the end of Ngarewa Drive to the left of the gravel car park. This gate opens and closes automatically. See “about this park for details”. It will automatically open for vehicles exiting the park at all times.

Toilets
Toilets

Mahurangi West has 6 unisex vault toilet blocks ● Sullivan’s Bay: One in the centre, one at the southern end and one in the campground that is for campers use only. ● Te Muri Beach Campground: Two toilet blocks; the one in the centre is for campers use only. ● Mita Bay Campground: One toilet block. ● Mahurangi East has one unisex long drop toilet located above the Lagoon Bay Campground.

Unsealed access road
Unsealed access road

Two short sections totalling 1 km of Ngarewa Drive are unsealed.

Park activities

History

Māori lived here in large communities. The park was the ancestral domain of Ngäti Rongo and there are four fortified pa sites at Opahi, Cudlip and Te Muri Points and above Sullivan’s Bay.

A sea captain, John Sullivan, married Merehai Kaipuke and settled at Otarawao (Sullivan’s Bay) in the 1870s. Their descendents farmed the land for nearly a century and farming continues on the park today.

More than 100 Māori and European settlers are buried in the Te Muri urupā (cemetery) on the park. The urupā was established in the 1860s alongside two sacred (tapu) pōhutukawa trees.

Scott Homestead, at Scott Point, is a reminder of the Mahurangi Harbour’s busy past as a hub of timber milling, ship building, firewood cutting and trade. Thomas Scott Jr built the Georgian style house in 1877 on the site where his father,a shipbuilder, ran an inn until it was destroyed by fire. Volunteers have lovingly restored the house and its surrounds.