Regional parks

Remember to be a tidy Kiwi this summer

All our regional parks are rubbish free. Whether you call it rubbish, trash or garbage, please bag it all up and recycle it or throw it away when you return home.

About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About Muriwai

For a map of the park, click here.

A windswept rugged coastline stretching 60km north showcases Muriwai's spectacular black sand surf beaches. At its southern end, Otakamiro Point is the site of one of our few mainland gannet (takapu) breeding colonies.


For dog walking (with restrictions) information across regional parks, click here.

Opening hours

Pedestrian access: Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours:
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. (Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours:
7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. (Non daylight savings)
Distance from CBD: 45 km
Physical address: 458 Motutara Road, Muriwai Beach
Casual group size: 75

How to get to Muriwai

Follow State Highway 16 to Waimauku. Turn left into Muriwai Road and continue to the park.

View larger map


Maps

Park facilities

BBQ
BBQ

There are electric BBQs provided or bring your own gas BBQ.

Beaches
Beaches

Maori Bay and Muriwai Beach.

Cellphone coverage
Cellphone coverage
Interpretation
Interpretation
Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

There is wheelchair access to toilet blocks.

Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)
Native bush
Native bush

There is access to native bush at Muriwai.

Notice board
Notice board
Parking
Parking

Additional parking is available at Village Green and Five Mile Strip.

Picnic tables
Picnic tables

Find your own favourite spot. For larger groups special conditions apply.

Potable water
Potable water
Ranger contact phone
Ranger contact phone
Ranger office
Ranger office
Sealed access road
Sealed access road
Toilet block
Toilet block

Park activities

History

Māori occupied the area for centuries. Ngāti Te Kahupara, a sub-tribe of both Te Kawerau ā Maki and Ngāti Whatua descent, lived there from the 1700s until the late 1800s. They lived mainly at Ōtakamiro Point, at Oneonenui in the headwaters of the Ōkiritoto Stream (Totoanui Falls) and at Korekore Pā (Pulpit Rock). Two pā (defended settlements) were located on Ōtakamiro Point.

Land was sold to European settlers and in 1909 Sir Edwin Mitchelson, helped establish the forerunner to the present park, the Motutara Domain. Mitchelson built a large homestead and extensive garden overlooking Ōtakamiro Point. Many of the exotic and native trees Mitchelson planted are within the park – look out for them amongst the regenerating coastal forest.