Regional parks

Remember to be a tidy Kiwi this summer

All our regional parks are rubbish free. Whether you call it rubbish, trash or garbage, please bag it all up and recycle it or throw it away when you return home.

Important notice

Park closed - Kawakawa Bay Coast road to Waiti bay (from Kawakawa Bay around to start of Tawhitokino access track) is closed due to flood damage.
About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About Tawhitokino

This small scenic park is located at the end of the Kawakawa Bay Coast Road. Accessible from Waiti Bay only at low tide, Tawhitokino offers safe swimming and a beautiful, secluded stretch of white sand beach backed by regenerating bush and farmland.


Park information

Pedestrian access: Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours:
Open 24 hours (Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours:
Open 24 hours (Non daylight savings)
Distance from CBD: 60 km
Physical address: 265 Kawakawa Bay Coast Road, Clevedon
Casual group size: 50
Access issues:

Access only at low tide.


Dog walking restrictions


How to get to Tawhitokino

From Clevedon follow the signs to Kawakawa Bay. Continue to Waiti Bay at the end of Kawakawa Bay Coast Rd. From there follow the Tawhitokino track on foot around the rocks and over Papanui Point to the beach. Access only at low tide.

View larger map


Maps

Park facilities

Beaches
Beaches

Tawhitokino Beach is straight and unbroken stretch of sand. Taiwawe beach is broken into two parts.

Interpretation
Interpretation
Native bush
Native bush
Parking
Parking

Parking at MCC car park only.

Toilet block
Toilet block
Toilets
Toilets

Park activities

History

Between Papanui Point and Ōrere Point lie a series of stunning beaches on the south east coast of the Auckland region. Tawhitokino and Ōrere Point Regional Park refers to two small and relatively isolated areas approximately two kilometres apart, which were purchased in 1981 to initiate a coastal trail along this amazing coastline. As this coastal trail has not yet been developed, these two areas of park land remain separate with no pedestrian connectivity.

Named after the rivers of Ōrere and Tawhitokino, the park land is known by tangata whenua as Karaka, Ōrere and Taupo. Te Urikaraka (Ngāti Paoa) claim kaitiakitanga rights to the stream (Tawhitokino) and the adjacent headland pa of Papanui, Te Puhaetuatahi and Te Kaiohorewaru as well as the kainga Te Rangipakihi.

Tawhitokino contains historic logging sites, including the remains of a saw-mill erected by the Cashmore family in the 1870s and used to mill the logs that were driven down the streams to the coast. It also has deformed chert beds of regional significance that appear to be of Triassic age outcrop among Jurassic greywacke in the shore platform at the northwest end of Tawhitokino Beach (and also to the northwest of nearby Waiti Bay).