Regional parks

Remember to be a tidy Kiwi!

All our regional parks are rubbish free. Whether you call it rubbish, trash or garbage, please bag it all up and recycle it or throw it away when you return home.

Important notice

Tracks are closed

Due to recent weather event - Access to park is only from the south via Kaiaua. Small bush walk tracks are closed. 

Track and campground closures for pest control operation

Track and campgrounds will be periodically closed during 22 March 2017 - 12 July 2017 inclusive - check here for dates and which tracks and campgrounds are affected. Hunua Pest Control Operation.


Keep Hunua Kauri healthy

Kauri dieback is a deadly disease, killing Kauri trees throughout the Auckland region. The Hunua ranges are currently a healthy Kauri area - help us keep it this way. Click here for more information.  Also see information about track closures in the Hunua ranges.


Kauri protection zones

Auckland Council has defined special areas of Kauri in the Hunua ranges for protection. These zones have dense Kauri forests so tracks pose a high risk of the disease entering the Kauri forest. Tracks through these zones have been closed to public access.


Wasp season

Be aware from March to May is wasp season - and with the particularly dry weather they are around in increased numbers.  If you have a known allergy do not go tramping without appropriate medication - mobile phone reception is limited in the Hunua Ranges.


Track closures
About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About Waharau

On the eastern side of the rugged Hunua Ranges, Waharau extends from the range to the coast.  Enjoy farmland, river banks and forest for camping, picnics, walking and mountain biking.


Park information

Pedestrian access: Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours:
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. (Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours:
8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. (Non daylight savings)
Distance from CBD: 90 km
Park map: Click here to download a park map
Physical address: 1748 East Coast Road, Whakatiwai
Casual group size: 75

Dog walking restrictions


How to get to Waharau

Drive south on State Highway 1 and on to State Highway 2 before turning off on to Mangatangi Road. From there take Kaiaua Road to Kaiaua on the coast, turn left up East Coast Road and the park is about 1km past Pukekereru Lane.

View larger map


Maps

Park facilities

SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas
SCC campgrounds and designated parking areas Waharau SCC parking area
BBQ
BBQ

Gas BBQ's only

Interpretation
Interpretation
Limited mobility toilet
Limited mobility toilet

There is a ramp which provides access to the wheelchair accessible toilets. There is 1 male and 1 female.

Mobility access (partial)
Mobility access (partial)
Native bush
Native bush
Notice board
Notice board
Parking
Parking

Additional parking is available at boundary campsite.

Picnic tables
Picnic tables

There are picnic tables in the main park or find your own favourite spot.

Ranger contact phone
Ranger contact phone
Sealed access road
Sealed access road
Security gates
Security gates
Toilet block
Toilet block
Toilets
Toilets

Park activities

Tracks

History

The Tainui canoe landed on the beach at the southern edge of the park in the 14th century bestowing the name Waihihi.  This area was originally known for its aute (paper mulberry) grove, imported from the Pacific, and for its  beautiful karaka groves, one of which still grows on the foreshore.

Ngäti Whanaunga, a subtribe of Ngäti Puku, occupied the land from the 17th century and still maintains an urupä (burial ground) on the park.
Waharau was one of the larger Mäori settlements along the coast in the late 1800s and was a summer residence of the Mäori King from the 1890s. This connection is maintained with the Tainui campground on the park.

European settlers milled the area’s kauri and beech from the 1860s. They shipped the timber to Auckland and across the Firth of Thames / Tikapa Moana to the gold mining settlements on the Coromandel Peninsula.

The Auckland Regional Council (ARC) purchased the park between 1970 and 1973 to provide access to Hünua water catchment land. It was subsequently developed as a regional park and was opened by the Mäori Queen in 1979.