Regional parks

Remember to be a tidy Kiwi!

All our regional parks are rubbish free. Whether you call it rubbish, trash or garbage, please bag it all up and recycle it or throw it away when you return home.

Important notice

Track Closures

Following the decision by the Environment and Community Committee to close a number of tracks and implement a further programme of high and medium risk track closures, staff and rangers have been working hard to identify more tracks for closure.

A rāhui has been placed over the Waitākere Ranges by iwi Te Kawerau a Maki. This cultural restriction by the mana whenua of the area urges people to stay away from the ranges to allow the forest to heal. The council supports the principles of the rāhui and recommends alternative walking and tramping tracks across the Auckland region. 

The list below includes additional tracks identified since the committee meeting on 5 December.

Long-term closures are in place for the following tracks:

  • Farley Track (Partial) - Huia
  • Tom Thumb Track - Huia
  • Tom Thumb By-Pass Track - Huia
  • Goat Hill- Huia
  • Twin Peaks Track - Huia
  • Christies Track - Huia
  • Kura Track - Whatipu

The following tracks, which have been temporarily closed for more than five years, are now permanently closed and will be decommissioned.

  • Bob Gordon Track - Huia
  • Nugget Track - Huia
  • Summit Track (Partial) - Huia

If visiting open areas of the ranges, or any kauri forest:

  • Clean all soil off your footwear and other gear every time you enter or leave a forest area with native trees and at every cleaning station
  • Use disinfectant after you have removed all the soil 
  • Stay on track and off kauri roots.

For more information about kauri dieback disease click here.
 
 
About
Park facilities
Park activities
Tracks
History

About Whatipu

The Whatipu area is a Scientific Reserve, within the Waitakere Ranges, owned by the Department of Conservation and managed on behalf by the Auckland Council Regional Parks.  It is a spectacular area of coastal dunes and wetlands.


Park information

Pedestrian access: Open 24 hours
Summer gate opening hours:
Open 24 hours (Daylight savings)
Winter gate opening hours:
Open 24 hours (Non daylight savings)
Distance from CBD: 42 km
Park map: Click here to download a park map

Dog walking restrictions


How to get to Whatipu

Take the north-western motorway to the Great North Road Exit. Follow Great North Road onto Ash Street which leads onto Rata Street. Take Titirangi Road right through Titirangi Village to the roundabout. Take Huia Road through to Huia. Continue on to Whatipu Road for access to Whatipu at end of Whatipu Road.

View larger map


Maps

Park facilities

Beaches
Beaches
Historic homesteads
Historic homesteads
Interpretation
Interpretation
Native bush
Native bush
Notice board
Notice board
Parking
Parking

Overflow parking at both campground and turners paddock (150)

Toilet block
Toilet block
Toilets
Toilets
Unsealed access road
Unsealed access road

Park activities

Tracks

History

Click here for a leaflet that contains background information about the area, a map of the walking route and historic points of interest.

For 800 years Māori favoured this part of the Waitākere Ranges because of its birds, berries and rich seafood resources, including shark. Many archaeological sites in the area reflect this long and intensive period of use.

Cornwallis was intended to be one of the first major settlements in Auckland but isolation defeated it, and it failed.  Instead, in the twentieth century, it became a thriving beach community until it was acquired as a regional park, and the beachfront cleared of baches.  The entire coast was exploited for kauri and a number of mills were set up. The Gibbons family pioneered the industry. One of their mills was situated at Whātipu and after milling ended, they established an accommodation house, with a post office, and held dances in one of the large coastal caves. The Gibbons’ homestead is part of the lodge still operating today.

In 1863 New Zealand’s greatest maritime disaster occurred at the mouth of the Manukau Harbour. The HMS Orpheus was wrecked and 189 lives were lost. Three of the sailors’ graves can be found just off Cornwallis Road on the Orpheus Graves Walk.  The region has an important role as a water catchment area.

The Upper Huia Dam was built in 1929 on the site of an 19th century kauri log dam.  In 1945 the Lower Nihotupu Dam was built followed by the Lower Huia Dam, which was completed in the early 1970s.